Badejo, Jega, Others Seek Organised Mobilisation Against Corruption In Nigeria

A Professor of Political Science, Babafemi Badejo and a former chairman of the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC), Prof Atahiru Jega, among other stakeholders have implored Nigerians to mobilise against the pervasive grip of corruption ravaging the country.

They stated this yesterday during the third Policy and Governance Discussion Forum (PGDF) zoom roundtable with the theme, “Fostering Good Governance Through Strengthening The Fight Against Corruption.”

Badejo lamented that the level of impunity with which corruption plays out in the public sector of Nigeria is not only alarming, but incentives the growth of corruption of all manner of wrongdoings.

According to him, anti-graft efforts in the public sector have been mostly incomplete prosecution or totally non-existent, or at best a walk in the park for thieves, whose only lessons would be to steal as much as possible next time, and bribe or sort out along the way of trial, and pay the escape stipend that would be required as option of fine against going to jail.

However, he said grand corruption scandals in the public sector are successful with the support and cooperation of actors in the private sectors, including the banking and financial players, multinationals and local private entities.

“More importantly is the need for leadership in the larger society, beyond politicians, and including religious leaders, who must lead organised efforts against corruption.

“We only can overcome if we dare to challenge the current subjugation of our people here on earth. It is Worthy to strive for a better life on earth, without hurting the chances of external life in heaven or Al Jannah.

“Nigerians, realizing the debilitative impact of corruption in their lives, must start organising towards showing their intolerance for corruption.”

According to him, some of the ways Nigerians can organize and demonstrate intolerance for corruption include, “Ensuring whistleblower protection as well as a social trust fund for whistleblowers who expose corrupt practices is essential for combating corruption.

 

“Nigerians can advocate for stronger legal protections for whistleblowers and support initiatives that provide anonymity and safeguards for those who come forward with information about corruption,” he added.

 

 

 

The renowned professor further said, with the lack of adequate political will and the body language of the current Nigerian government to end corruption, Nigerians must be proactive in demanding accountability and looking inwards and be ready to call corruption what it is, and treat it as a deadly poison that it is irrespective of how it affects their interests.

 

Earlier, Jega said Nigeria needs to identify various models of fighting corruption as practice by other countries.

 

He said other countries have used what is called combative strategy which ia very focused in terms of identifying crime and imposing serious punishment.

 

 

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